Request Account

User Name:  
Password:

Message
Body

  Logout | Change Password
No comments have been posted yet.
 
MAIN - READINGS INDEX - BIBLIOGRAPHY - TRANSLATION CREDITS - IMAGE INDEX
Table of Contents > 2.19 Carystius

2.19: Carystius of Pergamum, Fr. 10 FHG

Carystius, a historian writing near the end of the second century BCE, describes events in Athens at the end of the fourth century, after the fall of the democracy to Alexander the Great's successors.

After his brother Himeraeus had been killed by Antipater,49 Demetrius of Phalerum50 went to live with Nicanor;51 he had been accused of offering sacrifice to his brotherís divine manifestation.52 Then he became a friend of Cassander,53 and gained great power. At first his only lunch had been a bowl of vinegar with miscellaneous olives in it, and island cheese. Once he was rich he bought Moschion, the best cook and caterer of his time, and so numerous were the dishes prepared daily for his dinners that Moschion himself, who was given the left-overs, within two years had bought three tenement blocks and was abusing free-born boys and women of noble families. All the boys were jealous of Demetriusí boy friend Diognis, and so keen were they to meet Demetrius that when he had strolled about The Tripods54 after lunch, all the most beautiful boys gathered there on the following days so as to be seen by him.
This website makes available to the public the first two chapters of Homosexuality in Greece and Rome: A Sourcebook of Basic Documents, edited by Thomas K. Hubbard and published by University of California Press in April 2003. The index also lists the rest of the sourcebook's contents; the book may be ordered at www.ucpress.edu, list price $34.95 paperback. In addition, a file of close to 200 pertinent artistic images is assembled, including those published in the sourcebook and many others. Acknowledgement is made to University of California Press for permission to reproduce this material, as well as to the various museums that have granted permission to use their photographic images. Comments may be directed to Prof. Hubbard at tkh@mail.utexas.edu.