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The KUT Longhorn Radio Network Presents: Mexican American Experience Collection

Audio recordings including interviews, music, and informational programs related to the Mexican American community and their concerns in the series "The Mexican American Experience" and "A esta hora conversamos" from the Longhorn Radio Network, 1976-1982.

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PROGRAM INFO

Title:
The State Of The Chicano Today
Program #
1979-13
Themes:
Identity, Politics

Series:
Social Issues
Host:
Armando Gutierrez
Guest:
Tatcho Mindiola Jr.
Date:
Feb 27, 1979

The State of the Chicano Today

Tatcho Mindiola Jr, professor of Sociology at the University of Houston, assesses new developments in the Chicano Movement. Mindiola believes issues of identity and labels have become less important in the Chicano Movement. He also notes the emergence of a Mexican American middle class tied to the revival of politically moderate organization, like LULAC. Mindiola also observes a developing Mexican American intellectual class involved in the universities, publishing and journalism. Moreover, Mexican Americans are now grappling with how they relate to Mexico and Mexicans, including the undocumented workers. Mindiola concludes that that although the movement has become institutionalized, there is a widespread social consciousness among Mexican Americans that had only been present among the most militant groups in the 1960s.

Mindiola and Gutierrez then discuss the relevancy of the term Chicano and Mindiola concludes that although some conservative groups have appropriated the term, it still carries well-known political connotations. Mindiola then discusses the state of Chicano leadership and he explains that the most visible Chicano leaders have achieved fame because they addressed historical issues that plagued Chicanos in their states. Yet because of that specificity, their national recognition has not endured or strengthened the Chicano movement. He believes that Jose Angel Gutierrez and Leonel Castillo are two leaders who continue to command national attention, and he remains optimistic that more will emerge.

 

Center for Mexican American Studies | Department of History | The Benson Latin American Collection

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