Onda Latina

The KUT Longhorn Radio Network Presents: Mexican American Experience Collection

Audio recordings including interviews, music, and informational programs related to the Mexican American community and their concerns in the series "The Mexican American Experience" and "A esta hora conversamos" from the Longhorn Radio Network, 1976-1982.

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PROGRAM INFO

Title:
The Indigenous Movement In Mexico Today
Program #
1980-15
Themes:
Culture, Identity

Series:
Social Issues
Host:
Linda Fregoso
Guest:
Andres Segura
Date:
Feb 13, 1980

The Indigenous Movement in Mexico Today

In this interview conducted in Spanish, Andres Segura, a captain in the Confederacion de Concheros, discusses the traditions and beliefs of he ancient Chichimecas, Mexicas and Toltecas and his efforts to preserve and share Mexico’s indigenous heritage. Segura visited Austin at the request of several Chicano artists and leaders who asked that he help teach them about the Chicano Movement’s indigenous past and traditions. Segura explains that the traditions his organization preserves are mostly related to dance and oral histories and both play an important role in Aztec sacred ceremonies Segura further explains that the Mexica (or Aztecs) lived their life in accordance with natural laws and believed every activity reflected the divine.

Segura then discusses the term “Indian” and argues that to call Mexico’s indigenous people Indians is incorrect and ignores the region’s many cultures. Segura also explains the Aztec understanding of the origins of humanity. He also discusses the Aztec and Maya prophecies that describe the end of the world.

Segura describes the reactions of Chicanos who he has taught and explains that they have been eager to learn about their indigenous roots and shared past. Jose Flores, an artist who accompanied Segura, explained that Segura is helping to provide a spiritual base for the Chicano movement that will recharge activists.

 

Center for Mexican American Studies | Department of History | The Benson Latin American Collection

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