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The KUT Longhorn Radio Network Presents: Mexican American Experience Collection

Audio recordings including interviews, music, and informational programs related to the Mexican American community and their concerns in the series "The Mexican American Experience" and "A esta hora conversamos" from the Longhorn Radio Network, 1976-1982.

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PROGRAM INFO

Title:
Chicanos, Politics, And The Mexican State
Program #
1981-10
Theme:
Society

Series:
Politics
Host:
Linda Fregoso
Guests:
Jorge Bustamante, Rodolfo de la Garza
Date:
Jan 26, 1981

Chicanos, Politics, and the Mexican State

Jorge Bustamante and Rodolfo de la Garza discuss relations between Chicanos and Mexicans and the Mexican government’s recent interest in Chicano affairs. Fregoso first interviews Bustamante, a special counsel to the Mexican President on immigration issues. Bustamante describes some of the recent history of Chicano-Mexican relations and the miscommunication that characterized their early discussions. He explains that President Jose Lopez Portillo has always recognized the potential political importance of Chicanos, and for that reason he has instituted several policies designed to reach out to the Chicano community: including an open door policy and the scholarship program, Becas para Aztlan. He also addresses the issue of Mexican discrimination against Chicanos and explains how the situation is improving.

Fregoso then interviews de la Garza, a professor at the University of Texas, about the irony of the Mexican government offering services and assistance to Chicanos that it does not offer to Mexican citizens. De la Garza traces the origins of the new relations between the Mexican government and Chicanos to the EcheverrĂ­a administration, which approved the scholarship program proposed by Jose Angel Gutierrez of La Raza Unida. De la Garza explains that working with the Mexican government offers Chicanos many potential gains, including political legitimacy, economic development, and cultural support. However, they also face accusations of disloyalty in the U.S. that could potentially divide the Chicano community. He also examines some of the contradictions inherent in an alliance between Chicanos and the Mexican government.

 

Center for Mexican American Studies | Department of History | The Benson Latin American Collection

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