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The KUT Longhorn Radio Network Presents: Mexican American Experience Collection

Audio recordings including interviews, music, and informational programs related to the Mexican American community and their concerns in the series "The Mexican American Experience" and "A esta hora conversamos" from the Longhorn Radio Network, 1976-1982.

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PROGRAM INFO

Title:
Chicanos In The Midwest: Part 2
Program #
1982-03
Theme:
Society

Series:
Social Issues
Host:
Linda Fregoso
Guests:
Andre Guerrero, Virginia Ortega
Date:
Dec 3, 1981

Chicanos in the Midwest: Part 2

Guests Virginia Ortega and Andre Guerrero of the Ohio Commission of Spanish Speaking Affairs discuss Chicano Culture in the Midwest. Ortega explains that most Chicanos live in Northwestern Ohio in Lorain and Cleveland, where many Mexican families, who arrived in the early 20th century, have set up identifiable Mexican communities. In other parts of the state, Chicano culture has blended with that of the Cuban and Puerto Rican communities. Ortega then draws from her family’s experiences in Ohio to explain how so many Mexicans have retained the Spanish language and preserved a sense of identity. Guerrero and Ortega explains that quinceñeras, Cinco de Mayo celebrations and other holidays help affirm Chicano culture and identity. Ortega then explains that many parents are eager for their children to learn Baile Folklorico and participate in Mexican dance troupes as one way to learn about their heritage.

Some Chicano cultural forms are gaining mainstream acceptance in Ohio. Ortega explains that Mexican murals, in particular those by Robert Garcia, can now be found throughout the city. She also explains how a Chicano run clinic recently organized a conference to help inform health care workers better serve Chicano patients and to teach them about folk healing and its place in Chicano culture.

Both Guerrero and Ortega then discuss the popularity of Conjunto music in Ohio. They also talk about the limited Spanish language media sources. They conclude that Ohio’s barrio culture is constantly refreshed by travel to Mexico and the Southwest.

 

Center for Mexican American Studies | Department of History | The Benson Latin American Collection

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